The passionate conservationist

Eastern quolls have a good samaritan in their corner, writes David Wilson.

Blue Mountains ecologist Trevor Evans has won not one, not two, but 19 awards spanning fields from conservation to catering. The 56-year-old claims to hold eight licences, including a firearms licence and numerous wildlife licences.

Read at the Sydney Morning Herald..

Advertisements

Most dangerous reptiles in the world

If you’re off adventuring around the world, these are reptiles and monster lizards you most definitely do not want to run into.

The creatures on this list are as close to modern-day dinosaurs as it gets. These dangerous reptiles pose a threat to all species of prey, humans and wildlife alike. Read at the Adrenalist..

 

 


Chengdu pandas

Take a look at the adorable panda shots adorning the Chengdu Panda Base website (www.panda.org.cn). Like bush babies and koalas, pandas are super cute.

Thank those big dark eyes, those tiny ears and fluffy, tubby stomach. Unlike other endangered species such as sharks, pandas spark our “parenting mechanisms”. Cue the urge to coo and cuddle the bear-like black-and-white darlings native to Chinese bamboo forests. Read more at Agoda..

 


Insider guide to Indonesia: Sumatran rhinos

Nobody could describe the Sumatran rhino as ‘a looker’. In fact, the stocky, stumpy monster mammal with reddish-brown skin is spectacularly ugly. One Sumatran rhino hallmark – shaggy hair sprouting from its ears – raises the specter of an ageing human male in need of ‘manscaping’.

Unfortunately, unless we wise up, the Sumatran Rhino could be doomed to go the way of the recently discovered Tibetan woolly rhino species [http://articles.latimes.com/2011/sep/02/science/la-sci-woolly-rhino-20110903]. Only some 270 Sumatran rhinos survive – speckling Indonesia, Malaysia, Burma, Thailand and Vietnam. Read more at Agoda


Asia: Insider Guide To Five Asian Safaris

The human race stands at the brink of an epic statistical milestone. The UN has set October 31 of this year as the date the human population is expected to surpass seven billion people. As our numbers swell, the wild animals that we treat like awkward guests have ever less legroom.

Take a look at some Asian survival outposts – conservation zones where animals take precedence over people.  The line-up runs the gamut from mouse hares to mighty Komodo dragons. Read more at Agoda…

http://travelblog.agoda.com/home/2011/7/20/asia-insider-guide-to-five-asian-safaris.html


Amazing Asian dive sites

So you want to go somewhere wildly different but cannot afford to book a Virgin Galactic flight? Never mind. Plenty of extraordinary otherworldly action happens right under the waves, in the seas of Asia.

Diving Southeast Asia co-author David Espinosa expresses particular passion for the Raja Ampat area in West Papua. The area’s reefs are the most beautiful Espinosa has seen in 20 years of diving. Read more at Agoda…

http://travelblog.agoda.com/home/2011/6/8/amazing-asian-dive-sites.html


Tasmanian Devils

Tasmanian Devils look deceptively fluffy. Find out 10 intriguing things about them at Agoda… 

http://travelblog.agoda.com/home/2011/6/1/australias-tasmanian-devils.html